Astrid CRUAUD

 
 

Research Interests


I am an evolutionary biologist interested in phylogenetics and biogeography of insects especially pests and their natural enemies.



Current projects


AuxiGene (2013-2016; INRA-SPE): Molecular Identification of natural enemies occurring in European agro-ecosystems (in charge of phylogenetic analyses and web-based identification tools development).


BIOFIS (2012-2015 ; Agropolis Fondation ): Morphological and Molecular Identification of european insect pests (in charge of phylogenetic analyses and web-based identification tools development).


COLEOTOOL (2014-2016; CASDAR) : Identification of french rape weevils and their associated parasitoids.


TriPTIC (2015-2019; ANR) : Trichogramma for plant protection:

Pangenomics, Traits, and establIshment Capacities. (WP2 leader : From genome to species: pangenomic characterization).



Past projects


Tricho-NG (2013-2015 ; INRA-SPE) : Using NGS data to resolve species complexes and phylogeny of Trichogramma wasps (project leader).




Academic Background


October 2012-present: Research associate 2nd class (CR2) INRA at CBGP - Center for Biology and Management of Populations, Montferrier-sur-Lez, France


2011-2012: Post-doctoral position at UC Riverside, USA, California. Department of Entomology. In collaboration with Pr. John Heraty.


2010-2011 : Post-doctoral position at CBGP - Center for Biology and Management of Populations, Montferrier-sur-Lez, France. In collaboration with Dr. J.Y. Rasplus.


2006-2009 : PhD in Evolutionary Biology : Phylogenetic structure and biogeography of fig wasp communities (Hymenoptera, Chalcidoidea). University of Montpellier II and CBGP - Center for Biology and Management of Populations, Montferrier-sur-Lez, France. Supervisors : Dr. J.Y. Rasplus and Dr. Finn Kjellberg.


«Besides the Agaonidae (pollinators), five chalcid subfamilies of non-pollinating fig wasps (NPFW) are strictly dependent on fig fruits for reproduction. The species composition of communities differs among regions of the world and among groups of fig trees, and there are about 750 independent replicates of fig wasp communities throughout the tropics (ca. 750 Ficus spp. have been described to date). NPFW are ecologically diverse (gall-makers, parasitoids or cleptoparasitoids) and lay their eggs at different stages of the syconium development. This exploitation of different niches is correlated with differences in morphological traits. The hymenopteran communities associated with Ficus provide a formidable tool to investigate the evolution and functioning of insect community structure over space and time. You may want to have a look to this website for further details : figweb»


2006 : Master degree in Systematics and Evolutionary biology. University Paris IV and MNHN –Natural History Museum- Paris, France.


2002-2006 : Student at The Ecole normale supérieure de Cachan. Department of Biology, Cachan, France.